The most important day

The most important day

posted in: Synergy | 0

The fourth day of the conference was perhaps the most important of all the days. It was the day we all began to process all the impressions from the three fully scheduled days. Therefore, it was so important that we still were in the same place so that we could talk to each other and strengthen and develop what had begun in our brains.

As I see it, creativity and development are not happening in our hands even though it’s our hands that create our kind of projects, but it begins in the brain when we process all the information that will eventually become a piece of art.

During this day I participated in several great conversation groups where we discussed communication (which is my profession) in relation to art – and if you can explain communication more clearly using examples from the art world. Because art is the essence of communication.

In another group we discussed colors, different color schemes and whether it should be color wheels or color triangles, what is actually a “pure” color and why it is necessary to be able to understand color theory. Of course (would you have figured that?), we could not find one only answer, but the discussions were very rewarding, forcing you to really consider your relations to color and how to use these many possibilities of combining them.

In a group we discussed international similarities and differences. The Americans were startled when I explained that in Sweden, jewelry is not regarded as art, possibly there are jewelry that are “artlike” but those who make jewelry in Sweden are not called artists but jewelry designers. To me it is striking that in the United States there is a much more positive and permissive attitude towards art than in Sweden, and most of the artists are involved in several organizations / associations working on highlighting local art. Nevertheless, the American polymer clay artists feel like the polymer clay is not considered as an approved art material such as oil, metal, pottery and more.

We also discussed a lot about teaching. Most often, we polymer clay artists give workshops that are from a few hours up to a full day. How should you put it up so that the participating students get as satisfied as possible? How do you create partnerships and a willingness to develop within the group? How do you create the right expectations? And last but not least – is it important for everyone to bring home a finished piece?

So today I’m heading home again. I will bring with me all the inspiration, all the hugs, all the smiles, all the heartfelt comments, all the discussions, all new knowledge and all the joy within the polymer clay community! Look forward to seeing some of you in just a couple of weeks at the FIMO Symposium in Monza!

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